How to Bless Our Nation? 

Are you often stressed by the prime time news? I used to be.

Truth to be told, do you feel helpless when you see the mainstream news or the state of the nation? Do you feel small and can’t do anything about this country you love–and make it great again?

Before, every time I watched the mainstream news, I was mentally and emotionally strained. I’m not sure if I’m being socially engineered and conditioned by sensationalizing headlines, but the fact most of the news are more negative, it’s a bad way to end my day.

Here’s how I got a change of heart. You may consider these action steps too.

1. Pray for the Government.

From the biblical perspective, the government is “God’s servant,” regardless of what the news or many critical pastors or priests believe. In fact, it’s a divine command to pray for government authorities.

In St. Paul’s time, the emperors were tyrants. They even persecuted Christians to death. And yet, this Christian theologian urged the followers of Jesus to pray for the authorities.

Quite ironic. Is it possible that those critics of the government were, first and foremost, disobedient failures in praying for government leaders?

It is a Christian duty to pray for government authorities, regardless of who they are. You may not agree with everything they do, but it is still our responsibility to obey God and pray for them first.

And so a made I commitment to pray first before I complain. Surprisingly, the more you pray, you’ll find yourself never complaining.

2. Pronounce Blessings To All Our Leaders.

To bless it to invoke divine favor upon someone. It is the opposite of cursing.

Have you observed that the persons who often criticize use negative words and actions, and that they have the tendency to curse anyone?

Let’s be honest. When someone makes a complaint and does not go directly to the concerned person or authority, did it helped?

How many critics were really good problem solvers? If most complainers are not problem solvers, are they part of the problem?

There’s a strategy that if you want to transform anything, find the “man of peace” or the leader and bless them. Let God move first in their lives.

Remember, the government authorities are God’s Servants. If you keep on criticizing leaders, don’t expect them to perform well.

3. Partner With Our Guardians of Freedom.

I always believe that the government armed forces are our first and last guardians of freedom. Here in the Philippines, I love our cops and soldiers.

And why should I choose otherwise?

Sometimes I entertain the thought of putting critics and complainers at the very places controlled by terrorists, drug lords, and other radical ideologies camouflaged as religion. What do you think would happen to these critics?

It disturbs me the most to see criminals having more rights than the protector of our personal rights, including the rights of the law abiding citizens.

Instead of persecuting the guardians of our freedom, I would rather take part in upholding them in prayers, blessing them, and finding practical ways to bless these men and women in uniform.

This year, when my eldest son celebrated his 13th year, he chose to go to the camp where I served in mentoring and motivating leaders.

Out from his budget, my son gave doughnuts to police trainees, rather than have a party at our house. It’s a small, simple gesture but it blessed my heart when he also caught the hope of sharing blessings (and not speak badly) to our future influencers.

If words have power, how much more our prayers? And how about our actions?

Glenn Plastina (c) 2017

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